Starkey Research & Clinical Blog

The Top 5 Hearing Aid Research Articles from 2013!

1) The Clinical Practice Guidelines in Pediatric Amplification

After a 10-year wait, the guidelines for prescription of hearing aids to children were updated in 2013—making them the most modern of any peer-reviewed guidelines. There is little doubt that these recommendations will impact future publication and fitting protocols at clinical sites around the world. The guidelines are freely available at the link below.

American Academy of Audiology. (2013). Clinical Practice Guidelines Pediatric Amplification. Reston, VA: Ching, T., Galster, J., Grimes, A., Johnson, C., Lewis, D., McCreery, R…Yoshinago-Itano, C.

http://buff.ly/18TNGsz

2) Placebo effects in hearing aid trials are reliable

This article echoes publications from the early 2000’s (e.g., Bentler et al., 2003) that reported on blinded comparisons of analog and digital hearing aids. In those early studies, participants showed clear bias when primed to believe that option ‘A’ was a higher technology than option ‘B’. That early work was more focused on comparing technologies than this insightful report on placebo effects. Dawes and colleagues share an important reminder that placebo is real and should be accounted for in experimental design, whenever possible.

Dawes, P., Hopkins, R., & Munro, K. (2013). Placebo effects in hearing aid trials are reliable. International Journal of Audiology, 52(7), 472-477.

http://buff.ly/JF7DHM

3) Effects of hearing aid use on listening effort and mental fatigue

In the last few years, a number of research audiologists and hearing scientists have worked to document relationships between cognitive capacity, listening effort, and hearing aid use. An undertone of these efforts has been the assumption that a person with hearing loss will be less fatigued when listening with hearing aids. This article is one of the first published attempts at clearly documenting this fatiguing effect.

Hornsby, B.W. (2013). Effects of hearing aid use on listening effort and mental fatigue associated with sustained speech processing demands. Ear & Hearing, 34(5), 523-534.

http://buff.ly/JF7vrH

4) Characteristics of hearing aid fittings in infants and young children

The recent publication of updated pediatric fitting guidelines leads one to wonder how well fundamental aspects of these recommendations are being followed. This report from McCreery and colleagues is a clear indication that superior pediatric hearing care is uncommon and most often found in large pediatric medical centers. They also reinforce the consideration that consistent care from a single center may result in the most prescriptively appropriate hearing aid fitting.

McCreery, R., Bentler, R., & Roush, P. (2013). Characteristics of hearing aid fittings in infants and young children. Ear & Hearing, 34(6), 701-710.

http://buff.ly/18TNnhp

5) The Style Preference Survey (SPS): a report on psychometric properties and a cross-validation experiment

Closing out the Top 5: this article warrants high regard for rigor in design and quality of reporting. The authors delivered an article that will educate future researchers on the development and validation of questionnaires. Beyond this utility, the results are some of the first to identify the dimensions of preference that underlie the well-established bias toward preference of open-canal hearing aids.

Smith, S., Ricketts, T., McArdle, R., Chisolm, T., Alexander, G., & Bratt, G. (2013). Style preference survey: a report on the psychometric properties and a cross-validation experiement. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 24(2), 89-104.

http://buff.ly/JF740H