Starkey Research & Clinical Blog

On the Topic of Hearing Loss and Fatigue

Hornsby, B. & Kipp, A. (2016). Subjective ratings of fatigue and vigor in adults with hearing loss are driven by perceived hearing difficulties not degree of hearing loss. Ear and Hearing 37 (1), 1-10.

This editorial includes clinical implications of an independent research study and does not represent the opinions of the original authors.

In 2013, we reviewed an article from Dr. Ben Hornsby in which he reported on an initial foray into the fatiguing effects of listening to speech while managing a cognitively challenging secondary task (read here). The outcomes of his investigation suggested that use of hearing aids may reduce fatiguing effects of completing that secondary task. In more recent work, reviewed here, Drs Hornsby and Kipp assessed utility of standardized measures of fatigue among a large group of subjects with hearing loss.

Fatigue can be caused by a combination of physical, mental and emotional factors. Usually fatigue is temporary, resulting from periods of sustained physical or mental labor, and resolves during breaks, in between work days or on weekends. Intermittent fatigue has minimal effects on everyday life and health, but sustained fatigue, caused by unremitting work, stress or illness, has a variety of negative effects. Sustained and severe fatigue makes people less productive and more prone to accidents in the workplace (Ricci et al, 2007), reduces the ability to maintain concentration and attention, reduces processing speed, impairs decision-making abilities and may increase stress and burnout (vanderLinden et al, 2003; Bryant et al, 2004; DeLuca, 2005).

Though fatigue as a result of communication difficulty is commonly acknowledged by anecdotal reports, there has been little systematic examination of the relationship. As mentioned above, Hornsby (2013) found that hearing-impaired individuals experienced increased listening effort and mental fatigue that was mitigated somewhat by the use of hearing aids and other studies have suggested that the increased cognitive effort required for hearing-impaired individuals to understand speech may lead to subjective reports of mental fatigue (Hetu et al., 1988; Ringdahl & Grimby, 2000; Kramer et al., 2006; Copithorne, 2006). The purpose of Hornsby and Kipp’s study was to compare standardized, validated measures of fatigue to audiometric measures of hearing loss and subjective reports of hearing handicap.

The authors recruited subjects from a population of adults who sought help for their hearing loss from an Audiology clinic. There were 149 subjects, with a mean age of 66.1 years and a range from 22 to 94 years and mean pure tone average of 36.7dB HL.

Subjective fatigue was measured with two standardized scales: the Profile of Mood States (POMS; McNair et al., 1971) and the short form of the Multi-Dimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory (MDFS-SF; Stein et al., 2004).  Two POMS subscales assessed general fatigue and vigor, which was described by words like “energetic” and “alert”.

A presentation summarizing the POMS can be found here

The MFSI-SF assessed vigor and four dimensions of fatigue – general, physical, emotional and mental. On both measures, subjects were asked to rate, on a 5-point scale, how well each item described their feelings during the past week.

The MDFS in long and short form can be found here

Audiometric data included pure tone thresholds in each ear at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000Hz.  Perceived or subjective hearing handicap was measured with the Hearing Handicap for the Elderly (HHIE; Ventry & Weinstein, 1982) and the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults (HHIA; Newman et al., 1990).

Individuals 65 years or older completed the HHIE and those under 65 years completed the HHIA.

A version of the HHIA can be found here

The first set of analyses examined how the hearing-impaired subjects in the current study compared to normative data for the POMS and MFSI-SF.   Scores on vigor subscales were reverse coded and identified as “vigor deficit”, because unlike measures of fatigue or hearing handicap, high scores for vigor indicate less difficulty or less negative impact on the individual.  The authors found that the subjects in their study demonstrated significantly less vigor and slightly more fatigue than the subjects in the normative data. Furthermore, severe fatigue was reported more than twice as often and severe lack of vigor was reported more than four times as often compared to normative data. When subtypes of fatigue were examined, differences in vigor deficit were significantly greater than any of the other subscales, followed by general fatigue and mental fatigue which were both significantly greater than emotional or physical fatigue.

Hearing handicap was significantly related to both subjective fatigue and vigor ratings.  There were significant relationships among all HHIE/A scores (social, emotional, and total) and all subscales of the MFSI-SF scales.  Total score on the HHIE/A had a simple linear relationship with MFSI ratings in the physical and emotional domains. Total HHIE/A score had a nonlinear relationship with general, mental fatigue, and vigor deficit scores. In other words, low HHIE/A scores (little or no handicap) were not significantly associated with MFSI ratings, but as HHIE/A scores increased, there were stronger relationships. This nonlinear relationship indicates that as hearing handicap increased, there was a stronger likelihood of general fatigue, mental fatigue and lack of vigor.

Hornsby and Kipp drew three main conclusions from the study outcomes. First, the hearing-impaired adults in their study, who had contacted a hearing clinic for help, were more likely to report low vigor and increased fatigue than adults of comparable age in the general population.  They acknowledge that hearing loss was not specifically measured in the normative data and it is likely that there were some hearing-impaired individuals in that population. However, if hearing-impaired individuals were included in the normative data, it would likely decrease the significance of the differences noted here.  Instead, severe fatigue was more than twice as high in this study and severely low vigor was more than four times as high as in the normative population.

The second notable conclusion was that there was no relationship between degree of hearing loss and subjective ratings of fatigue or vigor. The authors hypothesized that higher degree of hearing loss would be associated with increased fatigue and vigor deficit but this was not the outcome. This observation presents a future avenue in which speech recognition ability could analyzed as a predictive factor to individuals reported fatigue.

Hearing aid use was not specifically examined in this study, yet it is likely to affect subjective ratings of fatigue and vigor. Several reports indicate that hearing aids, especially those with advanced signal processing, may reduce listening effort, fatigue and distractibility and may improve ease of listening. (Hallgren, 2005; Picou, et al., 2013; Noble & Gatehouse, 2006; Bentler, 2008). If study participants base their subjecting ratings of fatigue and vigor on how they function in everyday environments with their hearing aids, then the non-significant contribution of degree of hearing loss, as measured audiometrically, could be misleading.  Hearing aid experience and usage patterns should be evaluated in future work to ensure that hearing aid benefits do not confound the measured effects of the hearing loss itself.

The significant relationship between hearing handicap and subjective fatigue ratings underscores the importance of incorporating subjective measures into diagnostic and hearing aid fitting protocols.   Hearing care clinicians who counsel patients primarily based on audiometric results may underestimate the challenges faced by individuals who have milder hearing loss but significant perceived hearing handicap.  The HHIE/A and other hearing handicap scales, along with inquiries into work environment and work-related activities, can help us more effectively identify individual needs of our patients and formulate appropriately responsive treatment plans. Similar inquiries should be repeated as follow-up measures to evaluate how well these needs have been addressed and to indicate problem areas that remain.

References

Bentler, R.A., Wu, Y., Kettel, J. (2008). Digital noise reduction: outcomes from laboratory and field studies. International Journal of Audiology 47, 447-460

Bryant, D., Chiaravalloti, N. & DeLuca, J. (2004). Objective measurement of cognitive fatigue in multiple sclerosis. Rehabilitation Psychology 49, 114-122.

Copithorne, D. (2006). The fatigue factor: How I learned to love power naps, meditation and other tricks to cope with hearing-loss exhaustion. [Healthy Hearing Website, August 21, 2006].

DeLuca, J. (2005).  Fatigue, cognition and mental effort. In J. DeLuca (Ed.), Fatigue as a Window to the Brain (pp. 37-58). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Eddy, L. & Cruz, M. (2007).  The relationship between fatigue and quality of life in children with chronic health problems: A systematic review. Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing 12, 105-114.

Hallgren, M., Larsby, B. & Lyxell, B. (2005). Speech understanding in quiet and noise, with and without hearing aids. International Journal of Audiology 44, 574-583.

Hetu, R., Riverin, L. & Lalande, N. (1988). Qualitative analysis of the handicap associated with occupational hearing loss. British Journal of Audiology 22, 251-264.

Hornsby, B. (2013). The effects of hearing aid use on listening effort and mental fatigue associated with sustained speech processing demands. Ear and Hearing 34 (5), 523-534.

Hornsby, B. & Kipp, A. (2016). Subjective ratings of fatigue and vigor in adults with hearing loss are driven by perceived hearing difficulties not degree of hearing loss. Ear and Hearing 37 (1), 1-10.

Johnson, S. (2005). Depression and fatigue. In J. DeLuca (Ed.), Fatigue as a Window to the Brain (pp. 37-58). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Kramer, S., Kapteyn, T. & Houtgast, T. (2006). Occupational performance: Comparing normally-hearing and hearing-impaired employees using the Amsterdam Checklist for Hearing and Work. International Journal of Audiology 45, 503-512.

McNair, D., Lorr, M. & Droppleman, L. (1971). Profile of Mood States. San Diego, CA: Educational and Industrial Testing Service. Retrieved from http://www.mhs.com/product.aspx?gr=cl&id=overview&prod=poms.

Noble, W. & Gatehouse, S. (2006). Effects of bilateral versus unilateral hearing aid fitting on abilities measured by the SSQ. International Journal of Audiology 45, 172-181.

Picou, E.M., Ricketts, T.A. & Hornsby, B.W. (2013). The effect of individual variability on listening effort in unaided and aided conditions. Ear and Hearing (in press).

Pronk, M., Deeg, D. & Kramer, S. (2013). Hearing status in older persons: A significant determinant of depression and loneliness? Results from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. American Journal of Audiology 22, 316-320.

Ricci, J., Chee, E. & Lorandeau, A. (2007). Fatigue in the U.S. workforce: Prevalence and implications for lost productive work time. Journal of Occupational Environmental Medicine  49, 1-10.

Ringdahl, A. & Grimby, A. (2000). Severe-profound hearing impairment and health related quality of life among post-lingual deafened Swedish adults. Scandinavian Audiology 29, 266-275.

Stein, K., Jacobsen, P. & Blanchard, C. (2004). Further validation of the multidimensional fatigue symptom inventory – short form. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 27, 14-23.

vanderLinden, D., Frese, M. & Meijman, T. (2003). Mental fatigue and the control of cognitive processes: effects on perseveration and planning. Acta Psychologica (Amst) 113, 45-65.

Ventry, I. & Weinstein, B. (1982). The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly: a new tool. Ear and Hearing 3, 128-134.

Weinstein, B., Sirow, L. & Moser, S. (2016).  Relating hearing aid use to social and emotional loneliness in older adults. American Journal of Audiology 25, 54-61.

Can hearing aids reduce listening fatigue?

Hornsby, B.W.Y. (2013). The Effects of Hearing Aid Use on Listening Effort and Mental Fatigue Associated with Sustained Speech Processing Demands. Ear and Hearing, Published Ahead-of-Print.

This editorial discusses the clinical implications of an independent research study and does not represent the opinions of the original authors.

A patient recently told me that he wanted to put on his glasses so he could hear me better.  He was joking, but was correct in understanding that visual cues help facilitate speech understanding. When engaged in conversation, a listener uses many sources of information to supplement the auditory stimulus. Visual cues from lip-reading, gestures and expressions as well as situational cues, conversational context and the listener’s knowledge of grammar all help limit the possible interpretations of the message. Conditions that degrade the auditory stimulus, such as reverberation, background noise and hearing loss cause increased reliance on other cues in order for the listener to “fill in the blanks” and understand the spoken message. The use of these additional information sources amounts to an increased allocation of cognitive resources, which has also been referred to as increased “listening effort” (Downs, 1982; Hick & Tharpe, 2002; McCoy et al., 2005).

Research suggests that the increased cognitive effort required for hearing-impaired individuals to understand speech may lead to subjective reports of mental fatigue (Hetu et al., 1988; Ringdahl & Grimby, 2000; Kramer et al., 2006). This may be of particular concern to elderly people and those with cognitive, memory or other sensory deficits. The increased listening effort caused by hearing loss is associated with self-reports of stress, tension and fatigue (Copithorne 2006; Edwards 2007). In a study of factory workers, Hetu et al. (1988) reported that individuals with difficulty hearing at work needed increased attention, concentration and effort, leading to increased stress and fatigue. It is reasonable to conclude that listening effort as studied in the laboratory should be linked to subjective associations of hearing loss with mental fatigue, but the relationship is not clear. Dr. Hornsby points out that laboratory studies typically evaluate short-term changes in resource allocation as listening ease is manipulated in the experimental task. However, perceived mental fatigue is more likely to result from sustained listening demands over a longer period of time, e.g., a work day or social engagement lasting several hours (Hetu et al., 1988; Kramer et al., 2006).

The purpose of Dr. Hornsby’s study was to determine if hearing aids, with and without advanced features like directionality and noise reduction, reduce listening effort and subsequent susceptibility to mental fatigue. He also investigated the relationship between objective measures of speech discrimination and listening effort in the laboratory with subjective self-reports of mental fatigue.

Sixteen adult subjects participated in the study. All had bilateral, symmetrical, mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Twelve subjects were employed full-time and reported being communicatively active about 65% of the time during the day. The remaining subjects were not employed but reported being communicatively active about 61% of the day. Twelve subjects were bilateral hearing aid users and four subjects were non-users. Subjects were screened to rule out cognitive dysfunction. All participants were fitted with bilateral behind-the-ear hearing aids with slim tubes and dome ear tips.  Hearing aids were programmed in basic and advanced modes. In basic mode, the microphones were omnidirectional and all advanced features except feedback suppression were turned off. In advanced mode, the hearing aids were set to manufacturer’s defaults with automatically adaptive directionality, noise reduction, reverberation reduction and wind noise reduction. All subjects wore the study hearing aids for at least 1-2 weeks before the experimental sessions began.

For the objective measurements of listening effort, subjects completed a word recognition in noise task paired with an auditory word recall task and a measure of visual reaction time.  Subjects heard random sets of 8 to 12 monosyllabic words preceded by the carrier phrase, “Say the word…” They were asked to repeat the words aloud and the percentage of correct responses was scored. In addition, subjects were asked to remember the last 5 words of each list. The end of the list was indicated by the word “STOP” on a screen in front of the speaker. Subjects were instructed to press a button as quickly as possible when the visual prompt appeared. Because the lists varied from 8 to 12 items, subjects never knew when to expect the visual prompt.  To control for variability in motor function, visual reaction time was measured alone in a separate session, during which subjects were instructed to simply ignore the speech and noise.

Subjective ratings of listening effort and fatigue were obtained with a five-item scale, administered prior to the experimental sessions. Three questions were adapted from the Speech Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Questionnaire (SSQ: Gatehouse & Noble, 2004) and the remaining items were formulated specifically for the study. Questions were phrased to elicit responses related to that particular day (“Did you have to put in a lot of effort to hear what was being said in conversation today?”, “How mentally/physically drained are you right now?”).  The final two questions were administered before and after the dual-task session and measured changes in attention and fatigue due to participation in the experimental tasks.

The word recognition in noise test yielded significantly better results in both aided conditions than in the unaided condition, though there was no difference between the basic and advanced aided conditions. The differences between unaided and aided scores varied considerably, suggesting that listening effort for individual subjects varied across conditions.  Unaided word recall was significantly poorer than basic or advanced aided performance. There was a small, significant difference between the two aided conditions, with advanced settings outperforming basic settings. In follow-up planned comparison tests, the aided vs. unaided difference was maintained though there was not a significant difference between the two aided conditions.

The reaction time measurement also assessed listening effort or the cognitive resources required for the word recognition test.  Reaction times were analyzed according to listening condition as well as block, which compared the first three trials (initial block) to the last three trials (final block).  Increases in reaction time by block represented the effect of task-related fatigue.  Analysis by listening condition showed that unaided reaction times increased more than reaction times for the advanced aided condition but not the basic aided condition. In other words, subjects required more time to react to the visual stimulus in the unaided condition than they did in the advanced aided condition. There was no significant difference between the two aided conditions.  There was a significant main effect for block; reaction times increased over the duration of the task. There was no interaction between listening condition and block; changes in performance over time were consistent across unaided and aided conditions.

One purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of hearing aid use on mental fatigue. Interestingly, comparison of initial and final blocks indicated that word recognition scores increased about 1-2% over time but improvement over time did not vary across listening conditions. There was no decrease in performance on word recall over time, nor did changes in performance over time vary significantly across listening conditions.  But reaction time did increase over time for all conditions, indicating a shift in cognitive resources away from the reaction time task and toward the primary word recognition task. Though the effect of hearing aid use was not significant, a trend appeared suggesting that fewer aided listeners had increased reaction.

The questionnaires administered before the session probed perceived effort and fatigue throughout the day, whereas the questions administered before and after the task probed focus, attention and mental fatigue before and after the test session. In all listening conditions there was a significant increase in mental fatigue and difficulty maintaining attention after completion of the test session. A non-significant trend suggested some difference between unaided and aided conditions.

To identify other factors that may have contributed to variability, correlations for age, pure tone average, high frequency pure tone average, unaided word recognition score, SNR during testing, employment status and self-rated percentage of daily communicative activity were calculated with the subjective and objective measurements. None of the correlations were significant, indicating that none of these factors contributed substantially to the variability observed in the study.

Cognitive resource allocation is often studied with dual-task paradigms like the one used in this study. Decrements in performance on the secondary task indicate a shift in cognitive resources to the primary task. Presumably, factors that increase difficulty in the primary task will increase allocation of resources to the primary task.  In these experiments, the primary task was a word recognition test and the secondary tasks were word recall and reaction time measurements. Improved word recall and quicker reaction times in aided conditions indicate that the use of hearing aids made the primary word recognition task easier, allowing listeners to allocate more cognitive resources to the secondary tasks. Furthermore, reaction times increased less over time in aided conditions than in unaided conditions.  These findings specifically suggest that decreased listening effort with hearing aid use may have made listeners less susceptible to fatigue as the dual-task session progressed.

Though subjective reports in this study showed a general trend toward reduced listening effort and concentration in aided conditions, there was not a significant improvement with hearing aid use. This contrasts with previous work that has shown reductions in subjective listening effort with the use of hearing aids (Humes et al., 1999; Hallgren et al., 2005; Noble & Gatehouse, 2006). The author notes that auditory demands vary widely and that participants were asked to rate their effort and fatigue based on “today”, which didn’t assess perceptions of sustained listening effort over a longer period of time may not have detected subtle differences among subjects.  For instance, working in a quiet office environment may not highlight the benefit of hearing aids or the difference between an omnidirectional or directional microphone program, simply because the acoustic environment did not trigger the advanced features often enough. In contrast, working in a school or restaurant might show a more noticeable difference between unaided listening, basic amplification and advanced signal processing. Though subjects reported being communicatively active about the same proportion of the day, this inquiry didn’t account for sustained listening effort over long periods of time, or varying work and social environments. These differences would likely affect overall listening effort and fatigue, as well as the value of advanced hearing aid features.

Clinical observations support the notion that hearing aid use can reduce listening effort and fatigue.  Prior to hearing aid use, hearing-impaired patients often report feeling exhausted from trying to keep up with social interactions or workplace demands. After receiving hearing aids, patients commonly report being more engaged, more able to participate in conversation and less drained at the end of the day. Though previous reports have supported the value of amplification on reduced listening effort, Hornsby’s study is the first to provide experimental data for the potential ability of hearing aid use to reduce mental fatigue.

These findings have important implications for all hearing aid users, but may have particular importance for working individuals with hearing loss as well as elderly hearing impaired individuals.  It is important for any working person to maintain a high level of job performance and to establish their value at work. Individuals with hearing loss face additional challenges in this regard and often take pains to prove that their hearing loss is not adversely affecting their work.  Studies in workplace productivity underscore the importance of reducing distractions for maintaining focus, reducing stress and persisting at difficult tasks (Clements-Croome, 2000; Hua et al., 2011). Studies indicating that hearing aids reduce listening effort and fatigue, presumably by improving audibility and reducing the potential distraction of competing sounds, should provide additional encouragement for employed hearing-impaired individuals to pursue hearing aids.

 

References

Baldwin, C.L. & Ash, I.K. (2011). Impact of sensory acuity on auditory working memory span in young and older adults. Psychology of Aging 26, 85-91.

Bentler, R.A., Wu, Y., Kettel, J. (2008). Digital noise reduction: outcomes from laboratory and field studies. International Journal of Audiology 47, 447-460.

Clements-Croome, D. (2000). Creating the productive workplace. Publisher: London, E & FN Spon.

Copithorne, D. (2006). The fatigue factor: How I learned to love power naps, meditation and other tricks to cope with hearing-loss exhaustion. [Healthy Hearing Website, August 21, 2006].

Downs, M. (1982). Effects of hearing aid use on speech discrimination and listening effort. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders 47, 189-193.

Edwards, B. (2007). The future of hearing aid technology. Trends in Amplification 11, 31-45.

Gatehouse, S. & Noble, W. (2004). The speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ). International Journal of Audiology 43, 85-99.

Hallgren, M., Larsby, B. & Lyxell, B. (2005). Speech understanding in quiet and noise, with and without hearing aids. International Journal of Audiology 44, 574-583.

Hetu, R., Riverin, L. & Lalande, N. (1988). Qualitative analysis of the handicap associated with occupational hearing loss. British Journal of Audiology 22, 251-264.

Hick, C.B. & Tharpe, A.M. (2002). Listening effort and fatigue in school-age children with and without hearing loss. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research 45, 573-584.

Hua, Y., Loftness, V., Heerwagen, J. & Powell, K. (2011). Relationship between workplace spatial settings and occupant-perceived support for collaboration. Environment and Behavior 43, 807-826.

Humes, L.E., Christensen, L. & Thomas, T. (1999). A comparison of the aided performance and benefit provided by a linear and a two-channel wide dynamic range compression hearing aid. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research 42, 65-79.

Kramer, S.E., Kapteyn, T.S. & Houtgast, T. (2006). Occupational performance: comparing normal-hearing and hearing-impaired employees using the Amsterdam Checklist for Hearing and Work. International Journal of Audiology 45, 503-512.

McCoy, S.L., Tun, P.A. & Cox, L.C. (2005). Hearing loss and perceptual effort: Downstream effects on older adults’ memory for speech. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A 58, 22-33.

Noble, W. & Gatehouse, S. (2006). Effects of bilateral versus unilateral hearing aid fitting on abilities measured by the SSQ. International Journal of Audiology 45, 172-181.

Picou, E.M., Ricketts, T.A. & Hornsby, B.W. (2011). Visual cues and listening effort: Individual variability. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research 54, 1416-1430.

Picou, E.M., Ricketts, T.A. & Hornsby, B.W. (2013). The effect of individual variability on listening effort in unaided and aided conditions. Ear and Hearing (in press).

Ringdahl, A. & Grimby, A. (2000). Severe-profound hearing impairment and health related quality of life among post-lingual deafened Swedish adults. Scandinavian Audiology 29, 266-275

Sarampalis,  A., Kalluri, S. & Edwards, B. (2009). Objective measures of listening effort: Effects of background noise and noise reduction. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research 52, 1230-1240.

Valente, M. & Mispagel, K. (2008) Unaided and aided performance with a directional open-fit hearing aid. International Journal of Audiology 47(6), 329-336.